The Korean Cultural Centre Will Screen the film “La vie en Rose” on August 24th and Special Talk on August 25th

The Korean Cultural Centre in London is hosting another series of free film screenings and this one is called, Patchworks: Unwrapping My Korean Cinema. The final film is La vie en Rose from 1994. There’s not much out there about this award-winning film but if you want convincing that this might be worth a watch then read this interesting review.

SPECIAL EVENT

That this is the final film in the series is fitting because it was the debut film of Kim Hong-joon, the celebrated professor and film scholar whose documentaries and books have helped inspire this season of films being screened at the Korean Cultural Centre. There is a special event being held at Birkbeck Cinema on August 25th at 19:00 where Kim Hong-joon will give a talk about Korean cinema and his work and he will screen five films. If you have a deep interest in Korean films then this is the event to go to since he is a member of the Korean Film Commission, and the founder of the Puchon International Fantastic Film Festival (PiFan). Find out more at this webpage. You can book tickets for the talk here.

Here’s information on the final film in this season as pulled from the website:

La Vie en Rose    La Vie En Rose Korean Film Poster 1994

Running Time: 93 mins.

Release Date: August 06th, 1994

Director: Kim Hong-joon

Writer: Yook Sang-hyo (Screenplay),

Starring: Choi Myeong-gil, Choi Jae-sung, Cha Gwang-soo. Lee Jee-hyung. Hwang Mi-seon, Choi Jong-won,

Korean Film Archive IMDB KoBiz

Synopsis from the website: La Vie en Rose feels like a Tarantino movie set in a comic book shop. It’s a film that works over many genres, ranging from martial arts to vengeance, from coming-of-age to finding your place in life. Clerks (Kevin Smith: 1994) meets High Fidelity (Stephen Frears: 2000) as Seoul’s youth try to create and protect the place and

The community they’ve come to love. “Should I stay or should I go?” is a question many young people ask themselves, whether they are from the country or the city, from the east or the west. it is a story about refusing to give up even under impossible circumstances; it’s about refusing to give in to the destructive forces of everything from organised crime, to governmental bans and crackdowns on illegal activities; it’s also about trying to build something together, a community you feel you can belong to, where the outcasts, half criminals and homeless can also feel welcomed.

La Vie En Rose korean Film Image 1994

The Korean Cultural Centre hosts this event, and others in the season for free. This is the final season of Korean Film Nights in 2017 so make the most of the free films on offer. The film will begin at 19:00. so you had better arrive early to get a seat. The talk also takes place at 19:00 so get there early to get a prime seat as well. You can book tickets here. You can book tickets for the talk here.

The location of the film screening is:

Korean Cultural Centre UK

1-3 Strand

London

WC2N 5BW

United Kingdom

The Korean Cultural Centre Will Screen the film “Garak Market Revolution” on August 17th

The Korean Cultural Centre in London is hosting another series of free film screenings and this one is called, Patchworks: Unwrapping My Korean Cinema. Garak Market Revolution is a tiny indie film that was shown on a handful of cinema screens according to the Korean film website. The fact that the Korean Culture Centre is showing these films makes it the best way to see indie films from Korea. This film looks like a lot of fun and also has a social critique about youth unemployment and a hopeful message about finding the strength to overcome it – through traditional Korean chess.

Here’s information on the latest film in this season as pulled from the website:

Garak Market Revolution   Garak Market Revolution Film Poster

Hangul: 장기왕: 가락시장 레볼루션

Running Time: 88 mins.

Release Date: February 02nd, 2017

Director: Jung Da-won

Writer: Jung Da-won (Screenplay),

Starring: Jung Doo-won, Choi Si-on, Park Ye-young, Jung Da-won, Kim Kyung-ik, Kim Jae-rok, Jung Do-Won, Ko Gyung-pyo,

KoBiz IMDB

Synopsis from the website: In this sweet alternative story of youth and protest, a young man with a college degree takes a job at the local Garak Market without telling his parents. Being teased by younger peers for not having a white collar job and getting harassed by his boss, his life is not exactly ideal, but after discovering his extraordinary gift for playing the traditional oriental chess game, jang-gi, and falling in love with a girl who fights to make the world a better place, he might have just found a possibility to change the world for himself and his friends.

The Korean Cultural Centre  hosts this event, and others in the season for free. This is the final season of Korean Film Nights in 2017 so make the most of the free films on offer. The film will begin at 19:00. You can book tickets at this website. The location is:

Korean Cultural Centre UK

1-3 Strand

London

WC2N 5BW

United Kingdom

Shorts Night “Women Now” at the Korean Cultural Centre on July 27th

The Korean Cultural Centre in London is hosting another series of free film screenings and this one is called, Patchworks: Unwrapping My Korean Cinema. It is the final season of 2017’s Korean Film Nights and just like the last season, there are films being screened for free at the Korean Cultural Centre every Thursday.

The previous screening was It’s Not Her Sin, a black and white film from the ’50s. This week is Shorts Night: “Women Now” and this is totally up-to-date in terms of the representation of Korea and Koreans on screen. Audiences will have the chance to see six short films looking at the experiences of females in Korea from childhood to old age. They have been made by men and women, Koreans and expats, international co-productions and an animation made in Britain and they offer a huge range of stories

Here’s information on the first film in this season as pulled from the website:

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The Korean Cultural Centre Will Screen the film “It’s Not Her Sin” on July 20th

The Korean Cultural Centre in London is hosting another series of free film screenings and this one is called, Patchworks: Unwrapping My Korean Cinema. It is the final season of 2017’s Korean Film Nights and apparently the title is “a play on Kim hong-joon’s My Korean Cinema (2002–2006), an 8-episode essay film that explored the director’s relationship with the history of Korean cinema. With each of the 8 episodes tackling a separate facet of the history of Korean cinema, our programme will focus on two episodes within the film: Smoking Women & For the March of Fools.”

The first screening is the 1959 film, It’s Not Her Sin.

This is the first of six films which will be screened on Thursday nights from July to September and these screenings will then be further separated into two mini-strands of three nights each. These two mini-strands will be comprised of five features and a short film programme.

Here’s information on the first film in this season as pulled from the website:

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Korean Film Nights Closes with “He’s On Duty” on June 15th

The Korean Cultural Centre will bring its season of films concerned with migration in South Korea to a close in just over a week’s time with the light-hearted comedy, He’s On Duty. These titles have been programmed by students from the Film Studies Programming and Curation MA programme at the National Film and Television School and it has been a diverse programme made up of documentaries and dramas. This screening also has karaoke and a drinks reception so it’s worth going to!

Here’s information on the latest film as pulled from the website:

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The Korean Cultural Centre Will Screen the film “Seoul Searching” on June 08th

Seoul Searching (2015) is a coming-of-age drama that melds the tropes of a John Hughes teen comedy like The Breakfast Club with the true story about summer camps that took place in 1980s in Korea where foreign-born Korean teenagers learn about their cultural heritage. Since it takes place in the 1980s, a lot of the music comes from there and since it is a film in the mould of something John Hughes might do, expect memorable characters trying to find their own identities amidst comedic situations.

Alas, the trailer sank any interest in the film for me what with the plot being spoiled and the glimpses of the ugly appropriation of black culture which made me uncomfortable. While I don’t have an issue with people of different races experimenting in cultures, it has to be done with respect and a review on Black Nerd Problems has put me off the film entirely due to its dismissive attitude to race. Maybe I might feel differently after watching it for myself.

Here’s information on the latest film as pulled from the website:

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Korean Film Nights Continues with “The Journal of Musan” on June 01st

The Korean Cultural Centre is continuing its season of films concerned with migration in South Korea. These titles have been programmed by students from the Film Studies Programming and Curation MA programme at the National Film and Television School.

Here’s information on the latest film as pulled from the website:

Continue reading “Korean Film Nights Continues with “The Journal of Musan” on June 01st”

The Korean Cultural Centre Will Screen the film “Scenery” on May 11th

Scenery (2013) is a documentary film by Chinese-Korean director Zhang Lu. He has many features to his name and has toured the international film festival circuit including Europe. One of the director’s other films, A Quiet Dream (2016) was recently reviewed over on Windows on Worlds.

Here’s information on the latest film as pulled from the website:

Scenery Film Image

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The Korean Cultural Centre Will Screen the film “Bandhobi” on May 04th

Bandhobi is a film by Dong-il Shin, a Korean filmmaker who I had the chance to meet and talk to at the Osaka Asian Film Festival when he brought over his latest title, Come, Together (2017). His films cover a variety of social issues and Bandhobi looks at issues of racism, illegal immigration and the stresses faced by young people in education and work and those from broken homes and he does this through two sensitively drawn characters.

Here’s information on the latest film as pulled from the website:

Bandhobi Film Image 2

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Economic Migrant Documentary “Burmese on the Roof” at the Korean Cultural Centre in London on April 27th

The documentary Burmese on the Roof will be screened at the Korean Cultural Centre in London on Thursday, April 27th at 19:00. This is the UK premiere of a film that has played at the Busan International Film Festival. It is one of six films selected by students attending the National Film and Television School. Each film was made in a different genre but all touch on the economic draw of Korea and it looks to be an interesting programme that will introduce audiences into the lives of a diverse array of characters. Burmese on the Roof is the first in this series of films.

Here are the details on the film:

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