Katakana

The hiragana posts were quite easy to write (I don’t know about reading them, you’ll have to give me feedback) but an important precedent has been set – I have got into a regular release schedule for Japanese lessons. I’m finally taking this blogging thing seriously and using it to teach.

Yay positivity, eh? I feel like that guy off Half Nelson but without the drugs. Or the pressure of regular students. Or the good-looks. Sigh.

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Kanji Gold

A shot of Kanji Gold in action

http://web.uvic.ca/kanji-gold/

This downloadable 2MB freeware flash card program written by Dr. Denton Hewgill features a comprehensive and flexible testing system. There are a large amount of Kanji and testing options to stretch the user with different grades.

After a title page, it launches into a multiple-choice test with a list of possible answers (in grey) and a list of compounds (in blue) of the Kanji in use, are at the bottom to provide clues. Button between the answers and the examples can turn on or off hiragana, compounds and switch the examples from English to Japanese.

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The Basics of Japanese

I won’t assume you know the basics of Japanese so I’ll just give a basic introduction as to what it involves (if you do, skip this post). Remember, all languages require diligence and hard work. Japanese is a rewarding language to learn. Once you’ve mastered an element, you really feel like you have achieved something.

Japanese has what we may call three alphabets: Hiragana, Katakana and Kanji. These are character sets/symbols that represent sounds in the case of Hiragana and Katakana and concepts in the case of Kanji.

Kana: Hiragana and Katakana are known collectively as Kana and both represent the same sounds from the Japanese language. For example, House  – Uchi, is made up of the hiragana, U  う, Chi ち. Katakana has the same sounds but different characters, U ウ & Chiチ.

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Another Useful Link – Kanji Site

http://www.kanjisite.com/

The Kanji Site was launched in 1999 as a way for its author, Chris Jennings to “practice Kanji in preparation for the Japanese Language Proficiency Test”. The web site has “1,000 kanji, namely the entire official syllabus for Levels 4,3 and 2 of the [Japanese Language Proficiency Test] of the exam.” 

This site allows the user to view and practice identifying Kanji. The user may choose from a selection of symbols that appear on the left-hand side of the screen (and then in the centre). They may also click the symbol to bring up the Rōmaji interpretation.

A screenshot of Kanji Site
The main Kanji Test Area

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