Vin Japonais the story of Nihon Wine, Mayhem Girls, Daradara, Nohoue Nagareru, She Is Me I Am Her Japanese Film Trailers

Happy Weekend

The Light of Spring Film Image 4

I hope you are well

This is the second of a two-part trailer post. The first part is here.

The above image is from my interview with Fumito Fujikawa on his film The Light of Spring. I saw it as part of this year’s Osaka Asian Film Festival.

In terms of film stuff, I’ve been doing festival work and I have dug out some Wong Kar-Wai films in preparation for an episode of Heroic Purgatory.

Despite having completed the game multiple times, the release of Tactics Ogre Reborn saw me pick up my PS Vita version of Tactics Ogre: Let Us Cling Together. I’m continuing my latest run of Tactics Ogre by collecting characters on alternate routes and generally speccing my characters out with insanely strong abilities.

What else was released this weekend?

Continue reading “Vin Japonais the story of Nihon Wine, Mayhem Girls, Daradara, Nohoue Nagareru, She Is Me I Am Her Japanese Film Trailers”

Motherhood, Legend of the Galactic Heroes: Die Neue These Sakubou Part 3, That Time I Got Reincarnated as a Slime: Scarlet Bond, Kawano no Nagare ni, A Life of Climber Yamanoi Yasushi, Naniwa Kinyu Michi Haibara, Hadaka no Yume Japanese Film Trailers

Happy Weekend

The Light of Spring Film Image 5

I hope you are well.

This is the first of a two-part trailer post. You can find the second part tomorrow.

What are the first batch of films released this weekend?

Continue reading “Motherhood, Legend of the Galactic Heroes: Die Neue These Sakubou Part 3, That Time I Got Reincarnated as a Slime: Scarlet Bond, Kawano no Nagare ni, A Life of Climber Yamanoi Yasushi, Naniwa Kinyu Michi Haibara, Hadaka no Yume Japanese Film Trailers”

An Interview with Fumito Fujikawa, Director of The Light of Spring [Osaka Asian Film Festival 2022/Five Flavours Film Festival 2022]

The Light of Spring_director

With a background in both film and anthropology, Fumito Fujikawa’s career encompasses both documentary and drama and sometimes blurs the line between the two.

He first came to international attention with his debut feature film The Name of the Whale, a family drama shot in the director’s home prefecture of Hiroshima and centred on a junior high school boy searching for fossils while his family and friendship circle undergo changes. Critics noted its combination of documentary-like delivery of drama and the use of a partially non-professional cast and child actors and this earned it the moniker of a dramamentary, a style so effective at enraputring viewers in its world that it won the film the Audience Award at the 2015 Pia Film Festival. It went on to be screened internationally at festivals such as Vancouver, Hong Kong, and Taipei.

His next film was Supa Layme, a documentary shot in the Peruvian Andes following a family of six tending to llamas, sheep and working the land. It went on to win awards including taking best film in the Peruvian competition of the Lima Alterna Festival (you can read an interview with the director about that film here).

For his third feature film, The Light of Spring, Fujikawa returned to Japan and shot a work in Tokyo with a real-life family of four acting out the separation of the parents and children during the Covid-19 pandemic. Drawing directly from The Name of the Whale, he recruited two of that film’s actors, Yuki Hirabuki, nee Kimura, and her husband Masana Hirabuki. They brought their two children, five-year-old boy Shui and baby girl Chikasa. Together they convincingly relay a realistic story of a family falling apart, the quiet tensions and desperation between the parents affecting the children until a resolution of sorts is reached.

The Light of Spring played at Osaka Asian Film Festival 2022 in March and is currently playing at Five Flavours Film Festival in Poland where it can be viewed online in Poland (details here) until December 04th. At the festival, it won The Special Mention for the International People’s Jury award. To find out more on the background of the film, this interview was conducted with the director.

Thanks go out to Fumito Fujikawa for doing this interview and providing lots of background, to Takako Pocklington for translating between English and Japanese, and to the staff of Osaka Asian Film Festival staff for making the interview happen.

Continue reading “An Interview with Fumito Fujikawa, Director of The Light of Spring [Osaka Asian Film Festival 2022/Five Flavours Film Festival 2022]”

The Shaman’s Daughter, Our House Party, Patriotic Confessions: Breaking the Silence Part2, Magariya no Koi, Restaurant in the Forest Japanese Film Trailers

Happy Weekend

ID13_H04_Strangers_sub1 (2) R

I hope you are well

This week I have been off work due to illness. I am about to leave for an MRI scan. I hope it can reveal something to help doctors fix my head!

Anyway, this is the second of a two-part trailer post (you can find the first part here).

In terms of film stuff that I’ve done, I did a chunk of festival work and cleared my goals. I posted my review of Sae Suzuki’s short Strangers and an interview with her. I’ve got one more review/interview to come and that closes out OAFF 2022 coverage.

I watched Hellraiser on Amazon and that was about it. Well, apart from Japanese streamers doing Tactics Ogre Reborn.

What else is released this weekend?

Continue reading “The Shaman’s Daughter, Our House Party, Patriotic Confessions: Breaking the Silence Part2, Magariya no Koi, Restaurant in the Forest Japanese Film Trailers”

Aru Otoko, Roleless, Carmen in Cinema, Mahjong Saikyosen the Movie, Shinigami Tsukai no Jikenbo: Gekka Kitan, Cosmos 2072, Orokamono no Blues Japanese Film Trailers

Happy Weekend

Strangers Film Image

I hope you are well

This is the first of a two-part trailer post. Come back tomorrow for more.

What are the first batch of films released for this weekend?

Continue reading “Aru Otoko, Roleless, Carmen in Cinema, Mahjong Saikyosen the Movie, Shinigami Tsukai no Jikenbo: Gekka Kitan, Cosmos 2072, Orokamono no Blues Japanese Film Trailers”

An Interview with Sae Suzuki, Director of Strangers [Osaka Asian Film Festival 2022]

ID13_H04_Strangers_director (2)

Sae Suzuki’s career as a filmmaker began when she enrolled in the Department of Body Expression at Rikkyo University and studied directing under director/critic Kunitoshi Manda. She then went on to study film directing under Kiyoshi Kurosawa and Nobuhiro Suwa at the Graduate School of Film and New Media, Tokyo University of the Arts and her graduation film My Identity (2019) was selected for the  Busan International Film Festival 2019 and Japan Cuts 2020. She is currently making films as a freelancer and her latest work Strangers played at Osaka Asian Film Festival 2022.

Strangers is a melancholic but hopeful short film about people wrestling with experiences of sexual harassment, negative thoughts on gender and sex, and suffering in silence. Manami Usamaru of Sisterhood (2019) fame plays Yukie, a dental nurse from a rural town who flees her workplace with the clinic’s cash following sexual assault from her boss. A train transition leads her and us to Tokyo where she can be free to do as she pleases and so she changes her appearance and personality and meets up with a guy named Minato (Akihiro Yamamoto) who offers her day of non-judgemental companionship that allows her to process her negative feelings. It turns out that he has trauma of his own and together, as strangers, they offer each other hope for a new life.

The film comes at an interesting time as people in Japan take to SNS to talk more openly about difficult subjects like discrimination and harassment. Through excellent use of visuals and performers, Sae Suzuki allows audiences to enter into these difficult topics with a very thoughtful and beautiful film.

I would like to thank Sae Suzuki for delivering this interview in both English and Japanese and the efforts of Osaka Asian Film Festival staff for facilitating the interview.

Continue reading “An Interview with Sae Suzuki, Director of Strangers [Osaka Asian Film Festival 2022]”

Strangers 人知れず Director: Sae Suzuki [Osaka Asian Film Festival 2022]

Strangers     Strangers Film Poster

人知れず Hitoshirezu

Release Date: 2022

Duration: 38 mins.

Director: Sae Suzuki

Writer: Sae Suzuki (Screenplay),

Starring: Manami Usamaru, Akihiro Yamamoto, Sayaka Nakakochi, Natsuki Murata,

IMDB

In the last few years Japan has been experiencing its own #MeToo moments as stories of power/sexual harassment have hit scandal mags and SNS. Such stories have taken down a variety of people from cinema chain managers to film directors and producers. Despite this, problems of harassment persist in many areas of life. Fortunately, filmmakers are using their platform so titles like Strangers can shine a light on these problems.

Strangers is a melancholic but hopeful short film from Sae Suzuki that circles around the idea of individuals experiencing sexual harassment, suffering in silence, and the release from trauma found in shedding an identity and sharing a problem.

Strangers Film Image

Manami Usamaru of Sisterhood (2019) fame plays Yukie, a dental nurse from a rural town. Quiet and unassuming, it is only when we listen in on Yukie’s conversations with a co-worker that we hear her dreams, a vague desire to live by the sea, a vague desire for freedom. This desire becomes reality when the power harassment of her boss turns into sexual harassment and Yukie makes the impulsive decision to flee to Tokyo with the dental clinic’s cash. There, she can be free to do as she pleases and so she changes her appearance and personality and meets up with a guy named Minato on a dating app who is hiding his own inner pain. Together as strangers, they offer each other hope for a new life even as they wrestle with painful ideas from their old lives.

Continue reading “Strangers 人知れず Director: Sae Suzuki [Osaka Asian Film Festival 2022]”

Your Lovely Smile, Song of Rain, Taikutsuna Kamometachi, Yume nakaba, Yume no Manimani Japanese Film Trailers

Happy Weekend

Yume no Manimani Film Image R

I hope you are well

This is the second part of a two-part trailer post. The first part is here.

Due to illness I haven’t been able to do as much as I would like. In terms of media watched/played, I’ve been dipping in and out of Gabriel Knight: Sins of the Father and I have been trying to watch Park Chan-wook films. I’ve reviewed Thirst already but kept the Vengeance Trilogy and Joint Security Area on the backburner. So! I watched those.

What other films have been released this weekend?

Continue reading “Your Lovely Smile, Song of Rain, Taikutsuna Kamometachi, Yume nakaba, Yume no Manimani Japanese Film Trailers”

The Zen Diary, Suzume no Tojimari, Achira ni iru oni, Tsuiso Journey, Nagisa ni Sakuhana, Remember to Breathe, Japanese Film Trailers

Happy Weekend

Kamometachi R

I hope you are well.

This is the first of a two-part trailer post. Come back tomorrow for the next part.

What are the first batch of films released this weekend?

Continue reading “The Zen Diary, Suzume no Tojimari, Achira ni iru oni, Tsuiso Journey, Nagisa ni Sakuhana, Remember to Breathe, Japanese Film Trailers”

Yamabuki, Hyakusho no Hyaku no Koe, Yokosuka 1953, Tamaneko Tamabito, Kengo Yagawa Showcase: DIGGER, Nou Tenki, Quiet and Evil Japanese Film Trailers

Happy Weekend

Yamabuki Film Image R

I hope you are well.

This is the second trailer post of the week. You can find the first one here. This week, I posted a review for Rampo Noir as part of my yearly Halloween film review. I also took part in a Heroic Purgatory podcast recording covering Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives.

In terms of what I have watched, Teruo Ishii’s Horrors of Malformed Men and Park Chan-wook’s Decision to Leave, the latter of which was in a cinema, my first trip to one since Asagaya, Tokyo 2020! Decision to Leave will be reviewed at some point because it is incredible. I’ve dug out other films of his that I have on DVD.

I have also started playing the very first Gabriel Knight game.

What else is released this weekend?

Continue reading “Yamabuki, Hyakusho no Hyaku no Koe, Yokosuka 1953, Tamaneko Tamabito, Kengo Yagawa Showcase: DIGGER, Nou Tenki, Quiet and Evil Japanese Film Trailers”